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Započni novu temu Odgovori  [ 4 post(ov)a ] 
Autor/ica Poruka
 Naslov: Slovenska kultura, običaji, komunikacija i interakcija (priručnik za strance)
PostPostano: sri tra 03, 2013 7:46 am 
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Pridružen/a: ned svi 03, 2009 9:25 am
Postovi: 39503
Lokacija: Folklorni Jugoslaven, praktični Hrvat
Kultura:

Citat:
Culture

Religion

Roman Catholic

Cultural classification

Linear-active, data-oriented

Languages

Slovenian (official)

Slovenes usually understand and speak some German, though this is gradually being overtaken by English as a second language. Slovenian is somewhat different from Serbo-Croat, but Slovenes understand it well, though are reluctant to speak it.

Values and core beliefs

Slovenes are serious people, especially when it comes to work. They doggedly pursue their aims. They will arrive at meetings on time, in business clothes. There will be some small talk, but they will stick to the agenda. Being a small nation, they study foreign languages, and although English always has to be near the top of the list, German takes first place in practice.

Cultural black holes

Slovenes have one yawning black hole – the contempt for the Serbs and any South Slavs to the east. They tolerate Croats, but still consider them inferior to the Slovenes.

Concept of space

Slovenia is tiny in area and Slovenes are keenly aware of their smallness when compared to other former Yugoslav republics. Like Estonians (their equivalent in the Baltic area) they tend to make up for their smallness by being assertive. They are not a tactile people, requiring 1.2 metres as their distance of comfort. They love the outdoors and their mountains and make full use of these in hiking, rambling and climbing.

Concept of time

Their punctuality is almost Germanic, though they tolerate flexibility in time-keeping outside the business sphere. Buses and trains leave on time. Transport is generally reliable.

slika
This diagram shows a linear concept where one plans tasks in a sequential fashion, completing each one before going on to the next. One proceeds in agenda-like fashion, segmenting issues and solving problems one at a time.

_________________
sklon'se bona Zineta sa penđera, vidiš da te vlasi oćima kurišu
slika


Vrh
   
 
 Naslov: Re: Slovenska kultura, običaji, komunikacija i interakcija (priručnik za strance)
PostPostano: sri tra 03, 2013 7:49 am 
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Pridružen/a: ned svi 03, 2009 9:25 am
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Lokacija: Folklorni Jugoslaven, praktični Hrvat
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Culture: communication

Communication patterns

Slovenes are not particularly talkative people (other former Yugoslavs often found them dull or boring). They resemble Western Austrians in their factuality, Czechs in their thoughtful manner and measured tones. They rarely rush headlong into discussion and are reluctant to draw rapid conclusions. The speech style is much less loquacious and emotional than those of other South Slavs. Many interlocutors find them phlegmatic and lukewarm.

slika
In the diagrams depicting communication patterns, the depth of the initial segment generally gives some indication of the relative verbosity of the speaker.

Barriers to the speech flow or progress of the meeting are shown by orange shaded divisions.

At the end (on the right) there is usually a comment on what the outcome was (e.g. clarity, inconclusive, etc).

Body language and non-verbal communication

Slovene body language is the most restrained in the Balkans. They shy away from physical closeness, hugging or kissing. Although not entirely unexpressive (they are Slavs, after all) their non-verbal behaviour resembles that of the Czechs. Handshakes are firm. When walking, they tend to stride out.

Listening habits

Slovenes are good listeners, who remain attentive and rarely interrupt. In Yugoslav days they often felt tricked by Serbs and even Croats and consequently are on their guard against loquacious or devious speakers. Like Germans they listen for information and sieve through facts carefully. They dislike emotion or loudness and have a low tolerance for ambiguity or vagueness. They give little feedback.

slika
In the diagrams depicting listening habits, the orange zones indicates the areas of receptive, uncomplicated listening.

The yellow zones indicate the areas of complication or conlflict.

Audience expectations at presentations

• Need clear information
• No emotive content, please
• Plenty of context required
• Low key discourse
• Well-dressed presenters
• Recognition of Slovenian achievements
• We are not Serbs (or even Croats)
• Please be logical
• Make words count

_________________
sklon'se bona Zineta sa penđera, vidiš da te vlasi oćima kurišu
slika


Vrh
   
 
 Naslov: Re: Slovenska kultura, običaji, komunikacija i interakcija (priručnik za strance)
PostPostano: sri tra 03, 2013 7:54 am 
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Pridružen/a: ned svi 03, 2009 9:25 am
Postovi: 39503
Lokacija: Folklorni Jugoslaven, praktični Hrvat
Interakcija (druženje i kontakt):

Citat:
Culture: interaction

Concept of status

Like Germans and Czechs, Slovenes accord status to persons who have a high level of education. Professors and economists are respected as well as the professional classes. Slovenes have succeeded better than most ex-Communist peoples in casting off former party officials. This took time, but the regime is certainly becoming more and more meritocratic as time passes.

Gender issues

Few women reach top executive level, but the equality of the sexes is well-established in comparison with other former Yugoslav cultures. Women have entered politics and have a high level of education. In rural areas Slovene women pride themselves on their homemaking qualities.

Leadership style

The Slovenes were governed by the Austrian Habsburgs from the 13th century until 1918. In that year Slovenia became part of the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, which was named Yugoslavia in 1929. Leadership began in the Courts and filtered downwards through Court officials. Often in their history Slovenes have been denied the right to rule themselves. After World War II leadership was invested in Belgrade and practised according to rank in the Communist Party. Since 1992 Slovene leaders have arisen among non-Communist coalition politicians, characterised more by pragmatism than idealism or rhetoric. There is little of the flamboyance displayed by Serbian and even Croatian leaders. In business and academia, qualifications set standards. Orderliness in society is seen as important. Gradually Western European-style democracy is taking hold.

slika

Language of management

The Slovenian language differs considerably from Serbo-Croat and Slovenians welcome the difference. Both languages possess rich Slavic vocabularies, but whereas Serbs in particular address their followers with frequently fiery rhetoric, Slovenian managers tone down emotion and substitute logic and reasoning.

slika

Motivation factors

Solutions should be discussed more than problems
Be logical at all times
Give plenty of context and explain motives
Consider worst case scenarios as well as rosy ones
Evince calmness and sincerity
Refer to Slovene achievements
Recognise their independence and uniqueness
Praise the beauty of their land
Share their love of the arts
Indicate trustworthiness and loyalty
Use academic titles
Talk about quality rather than quantity
Offer worthwhile challenges

AVOID

Praising Serbs, Croats or Bosnians
Political discussion
Ostentatious behaviour
Calling them Slovaks :D

General behaviour at meetings

Meetings in Slovenia are orderly affairs without attaining Teutonic standards of Ordnung. Slovenes are procedures-oriented and generally prefer to follow agendas, though some digression is often permitted. They are in general very business-like and love nothing more than to close deals. Like nationals of many small countries, they are persistent and leave no stone unturned to secure a deal. They will also eagerly go for peripheral business if they fail to secure the central contract. As in most small states, everyone seems to know each other and networking is one of their strengths. Meetings start and finish on time and socialising is a frequent option afterwards. They are not great on small talk, but enquire politely about the well-being and comfort of visitors. They like documentation and write careful minutes concerning what was discussed and agreed. Red tape is not unknown, but less of a problem than it is in most Balkan countries.

slika
Key to Diagram
Linear-active people need relatively little preamble or small talk before getting down to business. They like to introduce bullet points which can serve as an agenda. Tasks or issues are segmented, discussed and dealt with one after the other. Solutions reached are summarised in the minutes.

Negotiating characteristics

Slovene negotiating characteristics are factuality, rationality and persistence. The following points are worthy of note:

The full content of a situation should be explained at the outset
Speculative or doubtful hypotheses are avoided (shades of previous experience with Yugoslavs)
Proposals should be clear and achievable
A gradualistic approach to problems is commended
One can wait patiently for solutions, but an indefinite delay is not acceptable
Problems should not be dwelt upon without an accompanying solution
Procedures and structures are an important part of discussion
Bargaining and haggling is low key – Slovenes prefer to keep within agreed parameters regarding price, delivery etc.
They like predictability and react against new ideas suddenly thrust upon them
When they conclude a deal, they can be relied upon to go ahead

Contracts and commitments

They rarely fail to meet their commitments. On the few occasions when they do not go ahead, it is usually due to lack of resources rather than lack of will.

Manners and taboos

Slovenes are well-mannered people who shun ostentation, flamboyance and unruly behaviour. They are very conscious of other Slavs’ exaggerations and like to distance themselves from their eastern neighbours. Do not call them “Yugoslavs” and do not place them in the Balkans. They prefer to be considered as Central European. They have a rich folklore and love music.

How to empathize with them

Travel around, see their country and share their enthusiasm for it. Socialise whenever you can, be generous at all times. Slovenes have a reputation for thrift but respond well to receiving gifts and favours. Bear in mind Slovenes respect correctness and civility. Charisma is permitted, but unnecessary in their eyes. They prefer solidity.

_________________
sklon'se bona Zineta sa penđera, vidiš da te vlasi oćima kurišu
slika


Vrh
   
 
 Naslov: Re: Slovenska kultura, običaji, komunikacija i interakcija (priručnik za strance)
PostPostano: pon lip 22, 2020 4:58 pm 
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Pridružen/a: ned svi 03, 2009 9:25 am
Postovi: 39503
Lokacija: Folklorni Jugoslaven, praktični Hrvat
Da vratimo i ovu iz mrtvih.

_________________
sklon'se bona Zineta sa penđera, vidiš da te vlasi oćima kurišu
slika


Vrh
   
 
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